FOOD AND TRAVEL

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Egg Korma - Fragrant, Flavorful and Nutty Egg Curry


I have eaten raw eggs. For some of you, it might be very disgusting until I tell you, I don't mean raw eggs like raw eggs in mousse or hollandaise sauce, I mean crack open an egg and gulped down. Take your time. 


Thank you for still reading. You see the disgusting fact that I stated above is to be blamed on my dad, even though I'm talking about the times when people didn't panic with the fear of salmonella.Years, years ago my dad would eat raw egg early morning, saying it was good for you. We four siblings used to watch him in pure disgust. It became like a morning ritual in winters, where dad used to entertain us with his "gulp down" and challenge us to do it too. My little cute brother (well atleast then he was) took the challenge one day and he gulped it down. While everybody was in awe, my little eldest child ego irked me to show them, I could do it too! And I did. And then never again. I still can't handle soft boiled eggs, or whatever else they call those semi cooked eggs. If you talk to me please talk hard boiled.


This is our family favorite recipe for egg curry. Its full of flavorful spices, aroma and nutty richness from the almonds.The spices look like alot, but if you have all the spices already, its really a very easy recipe. And if you don't, well its time you get them?


Egg Korma
Click here for printable recipe
Serves 2-3 

Ingredients 
5 hard boiled eggs (sliced into halves)
5-8 curry leaves
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
1 red onion (grind to paste)
1 tomato (cubed)
1 tsp ginger paste
1/2 tsp garlic paste
2 tbsp ground almonds
1 cup chicken stock/warm water

3 tbsp thick cream dissolved in 2 tbsp water, or heavy cream* (optional)
1-2 tbsp ghee/veg oil/olive oil

For spice blend*
1 tsp fennel seeds/sauf
1 tsp cumin seeds
8-10 whole black pepper
2 cardamom pods
1 tbsp coriander powder
1 tsp red chilly powder
1/2 tsp turmeric powder

Note 

* You can lightly toast the spices before you grind them for more flavor.

Method

Grind all the ingredients for spice blend and keep aside. Sprinkle some of it on the halved hard boiled eggs. In a wok, heat the ghee, add curry leaves and mustard seeds (its going to splutter so better be away from the stove). Then add the pureed onion.



Once the onion turns pink, add the ginger and garlic paste. Then tip in the almond powder.



Saute the almonds for about a minute. Make sure that you are cooking at medium heat so that the almonds don't burn. Next add the spices and tomatoes. Cook till the tomatoes have formed a paste.


Add the stock and let it come to a vigorous boil. Reduce the heat and arrange the eggs in it. Shake the wok to coat the eggs (try not to use a spoon as it might break the eggs). Simmer for 5-8 minutes.


Garnish with almonds and cream. This egg curry is fit for a king.


Serve with naan or chapati. And love boiled eggs. Hard boiled please.
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90 comments

  1. chicken stock is a delicious addition looks wonderful

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  2. Egg curry is so new to me but sounds wonderful becasue I love both eggs and curry.

    Happy Weekend!

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  3. oh my goodness....this looks beyond beautiful and this is such a satisfying looking dish! i love egg curries and you nailed this one!

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  4. OMG! that looks soo fantastic! Awesome pics. Thanks for visiting my blog because of which I was able to discover this :) I am sorry it took me so long to get here :) Will follow you from now on!

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  5. I must try this! I have one egg curry recipe I make and we all love it! This one is so different and it looks so delicious! Great recipe!

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  6. Hey Manju :) Thanks for dropping by.

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  7. Thanks Jamie... thats the thing about Indian food, the same thing can be made in countless ways :) I hope you try this one and enjoy it as much

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  8. I've always wanted to try this, though I usually end up visiting Indian restaurants for the buffet lunch -- more opportunity to try things! My fiancée and I make quite a bit of Indian food at home, and have some personal teaching from friends and family acquaintances, so I think we should put this at the top of our to-try list.

    Cheers and thanks for the step-by-step,

    *Heather*

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  9. I like your photography style and use of textures like wood, cloth etc. Nice recipes too! :)

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  10. This is stunning post , my post, i'm a sucker for egg korma my my your pic's are making me drool all over and regarding eating raw egg, i have seen my brother eating them ....i used to run away when they are trying to gulp it down...i have no idea how they still love it :)

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  11. My husband would LOVE for me to make some of your great recipes! This is his favorite type of cuisine. So happy to have found your blog via Mingle Monday. Have a super start to your week. Looking forward to being a regular reader!!

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  12. Oh my goodness~ this sounds so delicious! And your photo are superb. Glad to find you!

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  13. Raw eggs? I don't think it's bad at all!

    But yes, this dish does look great with the eggs fully cooked :)

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  14. Oh me too! I can't even think about eating eggs that are only semi-cooked or even runny omelets. Egg Curry is delicious. I'll definitely have to try out your recipe. It looks fantastic.

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  15. This looks so yummy! Liked your story about your childhood "bravery." Even I can't handle yolks, even hard-boiled. I will just take them out and eat the white part, which I do like! When I was little I used to love yolk and now something about the smell bothers me. hehehe, I'm strange!

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  16. I too know people who eat raw eggs, but I just can't stand! Semi cooked is okay for me. Egg curry is our favorite dish. My recipe is similar to yours except for the almond addition. Awesome shots. Love the backgrounds.

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  17. I am making this this week. Definitely. Many people are scared of making something that requires the work of the spice mixture but it's really so easy after that. I love it.

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  18. O I"m definitely going to have to try this. I LOOOOOOOOVE eggs. I like them runny but if I had a your experience I'd probably have similar feelings. By the way, your photos are looking great :)

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  19. I adore a runny egg - I'll send it back in a restaurant if the yolk is hard (if it's not meant to be). What's the point of not having sunny-side up?! And that should be the alternative name of your lovely, vibrant blog - sunny and appealling.

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  20. Rich Now you guys are making me believe I'm an odd one out! I have to re think this whole thing now

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  21. Welcome to the blog ! Go glad you found me so that I found you. You got a pretty blog there, Quit Eating Out - I agree!

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  22. Thank you guys! You are making my day :D

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  23. Thank you Sally thats very kind of you to say :) I know people who can't stand anything hard boiled, thats exactly the words they say. Haa I told you blame my dad, if it wasn't for that incident I might still be loving it. Thats the new trend anyway right? Whatever you got wrong blame it on the parents!( Kidding!)

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  24. I hate runny egg, and raw egg is a big NO NO! My elder sis used to have egg flip {raw egg in milk} when we were young & I used to gape in horror! Egg curry is something we had very often as kids, and was much part of the Officers Mess food as my Dad was in the services. So many memories attached to this curry...thank you for reigniting them K! Beautiful post & delicious curry!

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  25. Design Elements BlogFebruary 8, 2011 at 12:25 PM

    looks delicious! lovely greetings

    http://design-elements-blog.com/

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  26. I am excited to see a vegetarian korma seeing as I am a vegetarian! LOL

    This looks delicious! I just need to go and buy all the spices - I have salt and that's about it. My mom would be embarrassed!

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  27. So delicious and flavorful with all the aromatic spices you use!

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  28. Beautiful egg korma! Made me want to run into the kitchen to make some!

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  29. Pictures are seriously tempting!..:)..lovely post..

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  30. Beautiful recipe, and great step by step directions. I really like your blog, I cook a lot of Indian food and I see some great recipes here.
    *kisses* HH

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  31. Yep, that would steer me away from undercooked eggs as well. My grandfather died before I was old enough to know him, but I was told stories about how he used to drop a raw egg in his beer and drink it down.

    This dish looks fully cooked and positively delicious! Beautiful snaps as always!

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  32. Makes me wonder how times has changed. Our grand parents didn't hesitate to have raw egg and now even the sound of it is appalling to many.

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  33. This looks fantastic! Thanks for the detailed photos showing each step. Can't wait to try egg curry.

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  34. gotta admit my face that started showing disgust turned in to a huge smile after reading the post fully ! lovely clicks-- egg korma looks swellllll !

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  35. This looks so appetizing. I love your website, you are an incredibly talented photographer and food blogger!

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  36. I've bookmarked your recipe. I seriously wish that pot was in front of me right now. :)

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  37. Looks so delicious and tempting!

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  38. This looks absoluteluy wonderful. I could eat a big bowlful!

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  39. This looks delicious and I love the serving vessel! :)

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  40. Prerna@IndianSimmerFebruary 8, 2011 at 12:25 PM

    "A" (sitting next to me) just looked at the top shot and said, "Ma.. annaa" :-)
    N now I'm sure this is going to be our dinner 'cos u just manipulated my li'l one and she won't stop asking for "annaa" now!!
    Love the recipe! One of our family favorites!

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  41. Oh yeah ..whats with gulping raw eggs in winter ? My mom and dad had tried a couple of times as i watched in horror.Thankfully it ended there.Your scenario is so similar to mine.Even i'm an eldest child..and i have developed a distaste for half boiled eggs, the floating yolk . Hard boiled eggs anytime !

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  42. Welcome Mariko :) Glad you like it. Do let me know how it turns out

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  43. Thank you Monica for your kind words :) Glad you like the blog.

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  44. Thats the sweetest comment ever! LOADS Loads of love to "A" Glad you like it :)

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  45. Thank God you wrote that!now I don't feel so abnormal about having a dad who used to eat raw eggs ha :)

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  46. Wow Kulsum, the photographs are gorgeous! Where did you get the slate-y background in the first pic from? And I agree with Azmeena, love the kadhai and the wooden ladle... very rustic look to all the pics.

    I haven't given egg curry a try ever. Yours looks like a yummy recipe to start with! Enjoyed the post and the story abt your childhood... parents talk us into doing such strange things no? :-)

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  47. I can't believe you ate a raw egg, how brave! I could never do it, challenge or no challenge. I love that wood surface you are shooting on, it's got a nice distressed look that is really eye catching.

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  48. Beautifully done...thank you..

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  49. This is a royal egg curry. & very beautiful photographs. LOVE that background.

    I have heard of people eating raw egg. Even breaking them in to milk and having it.:-) can't think of having it myself, but I am not disgusted.

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  50. Tanvi_SinfullySpicyFebruary 8, 2011 at 12:25 PM

    My uncle[chacha] developed this nasty habit of eating raw eggs in his college days.I remember it from my childhood coz my granny used to shout at him when he used to mix 2 raw eggs with cold milk in the mornings.. ..can u imagine milk +raw eggs! Anyways people have their own likes and dislikes..I dont like soft boiled eggs as such but love the over easy ones. P is nuts over egg curry.His fav combo is dal chawal +egg curry.I make it almost every week.But I make only the onion & tomato masala.you nw that normal curry one..And I knw he ll like your exotic version a lot. See here I go again..always have so much to speak.
    I found mustard greens at Indian store.I also get confused between greens..even tasting them is not of much use.I once brought kale greens thinking its sarson :)...So I stuck to Indian stores..may be you can try there!!!

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  51. Simply delightful. This splendid dish is possibly the perfect way to enjoy eggs! The spice blend here is sublime, . The step by step pictures are wonderful. Great recipe!

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  52. I love curry, but I've never tried an egg curry. It looks delicious. I love the step by step photos.

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  53. My dad used to have raw eggs + milk + honey in the mornings and as a child, I would run my finger around the inside of the glass and lick it up when mom and dad weren't looking. Can't imagine I used to do that considering now I don't quite like the thought of raw eggs in ice creams or mousses etc.

    You are a brave one to have cracked open and gulped down the egg!

    Love the egg curry and the pictures.

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  54. Kulsum this egg curry looks soooo good! such a flavorful curry! Love the pics!

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  55. Thank you Aqua :) Glad u liked the curry! Now that I hear everyone saying about mixing fresh cracked egg with milk, I think I feel less disgusted about the whole thing! Glad everyone has disgusting stories to share ;) makes my life easier

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  56. I am not sure if I have visited ur space before..whatever it may ..i am just admiring ur pictures and love to be back always..

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  57. This reminds me of shakshuka! But, to be honest, I bet this even better ;-) The flavors of the curry with the egg sound like such a wonderful combo!

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  58. kind of reminded me of butter chicken :P . havent had indian food more than a year now :(

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  59. Yummmmm yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm im bookmarking this yummilicious recipe!!!

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  60. In a wok, heat the ghee, add curry leaves and mustard seeds (its going to splutter so better be away from the stove)
    Once the onion turn pink,...

    ? Did you skip a step?

    Also, where can you purchase your copper bowl at a reasonable price?

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  61. Ah! Wow no one else brought that to my notice. Thank you Anu - Add the onions and then they turn pink! Are you trying it? If yes, do it me know how it turns out. I bought the copper bowl in one of the supermarkets here in Kuwait - But I have seen it with many people. Depends on where you live.

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  62. Thanks for clarlifying this. I will try it. I have all the ingredients except for the curry leaves. Is it OK to omit the curry leaves?

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  63. One last question, red chilly powder...is that the same as cayenne pepper?

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  64. Curry leaves is not a must must but it does add a certain flavor. If you can get it, it would be great but if not it shouldn't stop you from trying it. The recipe will work well either way. :-)

    In India red chilly powder, is a more generic name for a hot variety of red chillies. World wide the commonly used "chilli powder" is not just chilly but often times include other spices like cumin etc. Cayenne on the other hand is also a hot variety of red pepper so it works perfectly here. You can certainly use it. I hope you enjoy it.

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  65. Thank you..I will definitely try it and will get back to you on this dish. I love Indian foods. I think when it comes to vegetarian dishes, Indians are very creative with vegetarian dishes.

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  66. i'd love some right now with some roti on the side:)

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  67. I was able to find fresh curry leaves in an asian market which was not too expensive. I wlil be trying this dish in the few days. How do you store remaining curry leaves - in the freezer?

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  68. 1 red onion - small I suppose?

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  69. I sure need to work on making my recipes more clear :-) Anyway generally when I write 1 red onion I mean a medium size , hope that helps. I usually wash, pat dry and store in a jar topped with a tissue before putting the lid. Lasts for a few weeks.

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  70. Your opinion: In other Indian recipes I have come across, I have seen dried bay leaves in the recipes. Do you think that I can replace curry leaves for the bay leaves and if I can substitute, how many curry leaves for each bay leaf?

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  71. Well yes Indian recipes use bay leaf but curry leaves and bay leaves are not exactly substitutes. They have completely different flavors. Best is to omit it if you don't have it.

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  72. OK, one last question of all. I hope you are not tired of my questions, but I'm comparing your recipe with the one written for Tasty Kitchen. On tasty kitchen you have a measured quantity of spiced blend (curry powder). On your blog, you don't have a measured quantity, so how much is:

    " Next add the spices and tomatoes. Cook till the tomatoes have formed a paste."

    Do you use the remainder of the spices you have grind up or you measure out 1-1/2 tsp as suggested in Tasty Kitchen? Sorry for too many questions, but I'm really into Indian cooking done right.

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  73. Hi Anu,

    I didn't know you were comparing the recipe on tasty kitchen with this one. On Tasty kitchen, instead of the different spices stated here (which many people don't have or use or want to buy for one recipe) I suggested a curry powder which is widely available.Many of Indian friends use ready made curry powder too and its works just fine. I always recommend using fresh spices but I also understand that not every one is eating Indian food every single day or as enthusiastic buying all the spices for one single recipe.

    As for your question - whether on the blog or tasty kitchen, I have mentioned that sprinkle some of the spice blend/curry powder on the hard boiled and use the remaining while cooking. Its just the way I like to do it but you can use all of it while cooking and skipping sprinkling on eggs.

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  74. OK, I actually made this dish tonight, but I think it did not turn out for me. I'm used to eating Korma where the sauce is a smooth texture, but mine was grainy and crunchy. I might of used too much onions. I used a medium-size onion, about 10 ounces. Maybe it was should of been a small onion? Put it in a food processor and process until it was like a paste, but next time, I may use a blender which will be more smooth. Flavor was very good. It was just the texture of the sauce that I didn't care for. So what do you suppose I did that was wrong?

    Also, I notice I had black mustard seeds all over the stove and floor. What a mess! I'll act faster next time. I haven't given up. I will try this dish again, but maybe you could tell me what I did wrong.

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  75. Thank you the trying the recipe. I'm sorry to hear it didn't turn out right for you even though you enjoyed the flavors :-). For the textural problem I don't think it has to do with onions-a little more or less should not hurt. What about the almond powder? if your almond powder is not fine enough, it might give you that grainy texture.

    I hope you give it another try and enjoy it.

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  76. Is this comment thread for real? I admire your patience K for answering every query in detail!

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  77. No, it was not the almond powder. It was the crunchiness of the onions and you can taste that the onions were not cooked long enough and wasn't as smooth. What I end up doing was scooping all the egg out an put the sauce in a blender to process until smooth. Then I put the egg back in the sauce.

    When you say cook the onions until it turned pink, how long does that process take because I didn't cooked the onions that long because the pan was getting too dry.

    Or...when you say boil vigorously, do you boil for awhile to cook down the onions, maybe? Sorry, so many questions.

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  78. Amelia from Z Tasty LifeMarch 4, 2011 at 11:46 PM

    I giggled reading the egg story...even a bit quivered, but just because I had similar memories of my own. About eating raw eggs and many other similar foods. My mom would get milk directly milked from the cow, boil it and then take the fat skin on top of it and spread it on toast... similar quiver for me, still today!
    On a separate note, this egg curry sounds amazing...I can't wait to try it. I am new to your blog and loving every second I am in here! The photographs are exquisite and I like your writing too!

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  79. Thank you so much Amelia for all the kind words. I love saying I'm "glad"here when someone shares a similar story :-) I checked out your blog and your photographs are "exquisite"

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  80. Going to try this one.A pregnant neighbour who wants to "start" eating eggs for the "healthy quotient" asked me if I make egg curry and how.My big mouth opens before my mind gets to put all thoughts together..and I blurt out..ya sure come over I'd love to cook for you...and then I realise..that was dumb..coz this lady is not like me...I never ever follow recipies to the T..I read and try ..I make onion n garlic paste egg curry which is ok ..nothing majestic..but she well she's a great cook!Umm..big deal then I know what I need to do..search for my favorite cooking blog and type egg curry and viola!!:)Thanks a ton.
    P.S.I have tried the chicken curry too.Just love the simplicity in your cooking and that word"home" that smells in everything:)

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  81. gj - Thank you for your kind works. I'm glad you enjoy the blog and the recipes. Let me know how it goes with the neighbor ;-)

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  82. Your opinion: In other Indian recipes I have come across, I have seen dried bay leaves in the recipes. Do you think that I can replace curry leaves for the bay leaves and if I can substitute, how many curry leaves for each bay leaf?

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  83. Thank you so much for forwarding me this lovely recipe. I loooove curry and can't wait to try it. I am so happy I stumbled on this site, I am already a fan. I have all the ingredients in the house except fresh curry leaves so I am almost ready to go. Thanks for the beautiful illustrations,good job. Sandra

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  84. Egg Curry looks delicious and mouth watering. Colorful too.

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  85. Hi,
    First time on your blog and liked the content. I too recently posted an Egg curry - http://tastejunction.blogspot.com/2011/05/easy-can-be-delicious-too.html- but there are a few interesting variations here with almond paste and chicken stock. Will give this a try too.

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  86. I just came across your blog through Globetrotter Diaries and I love your pictures and your style of writing!!!! I can totally relate to eating raw eggs like what you went through because my parents forced them down my throat when I was little. YUCK! Besides having Kuwait and raw eggs in common, we both like to blog. So if you have time, please stop by my blog Deepasdoodles.blogspot.com.
    I will try out this hard boiled egg curry recipe soon.:)

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  87. I tried this recipe and loved it! The mustard and vennel seeds really add a wonderfull touch to it. I added some veggies (bellpepper, snow peas) and it was really nice. Thanks!

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  88. Emma - Thanks for letting me know. Glad you enjoyed it!

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  89. Thanks Kulsum. Made it yesterday and it was delish!

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  90. Why no mention of salt ? Is it because the chicken stock would have salt any ways ?

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